September 2007 Archives

Improve your online sharing

This is an interesting decomposition of the knowledge sharing process.

Sharing is a pretty straight-forward process. Someone finds something interesting/controversial/useful enough to tell someone else about it. Breaking down this process into smaller steps can help you design better methods for sharing.

  1. Something worth sharing
    First, you need something worth sharing. It could be an object, like a video, slideshow, picture, or URL. Or it could be an idea or process, like a new way to cook spaghetti or a better way to design web sites. Ideas, however, need to be distilled into an object as well��since we��re on the Web most of the time the objects are URLs.
  2. Pivot points for sharing
    A good question to ask is: what are the pivot points on which this thing is shared? Here��s an example: most TV shows are shared not by the network they��re on, but by the title of the show. This suggests that network doesn��t matter as much as the show, and so giving people the tools to share the show is a higher priority. However, if you notice when you��re watching a TV show, there is a ton of network advertising��but nobody really shares at this level so it��s just not that effective.
  3. Make it easier to share
    How do you make something easier to share? Make it a PDF that people can email. Provide an explicit permalink to the URL. If you��ve got a video you place the embed code right alongside it. (and build the functionality to support the actual embedding). If you��ve got a book review, you might put an �email this�� share feature beside it. Prompt the user to share and give them tools to do so.
  4. Personalize the share
    How can you make the act of sharing more effective? One thing you can do is to personalize the share message. Instead of saying �a friend wanted to share with you��. say �Your friend Josh wanted to share with you��. This is a more compelling message, especially in a age of SPAM when we are inundated with fake sharing all the time.
  5. Follow-up the sharing
    Also, follow-up the share. Who did they send it to? Did that person come and interact as a result of the sharing? Pay attention to this metric because it measures whether or not people are sharing your stuff persuasively. If they are not, help them do so by prompting them with a default message. Also, if it makes sense record the message that was shared so you can know if there are issues you��re not aware of.
  6. Leverage the Popularity of Sharing
    Create a �most shared�� list. This helps people find the best content when they are looking for it. However, this probably isn��t a good primary navigation strategy because then people rely on it too much. Have it available, but make it secondary so that all of your content is still available and exposed.

Building tools for sharing is how you enable word-of-mouth online. By breaking it down into a process with many steps, you can begin to optimize each step and therefore improve the overall effect.

Improve your online sharing
Josh
Mon, 24 Sep 2007 13:19:18 GMT

Improve your online sharing

This is an interesting decomposition of the knowledge sharing process.

Sharing is a pretty straight-forward process. Someone finds something interesting/controversial/useful enough to tell someone else about it. Breaking down this process into smaller steps can help you design better methods for sharing.

  1. Something worth sharing
    First, you need something worth sharing. It could be an object, like a video, slideshow, picture, or URL. Or it could be an idea or process, like a new way to cook spaghetti or a better way to design web sites. Ideas, however, need to be distilled into an object as well…since we’re on the Web most of the time the objects are URLs.
  2. Pivot points for sharing
    A good question to ask is: what are the pivot points on which this thing is shared? Here’s an example: most TV shows are shared not by the network they’re on, but by the title of the show. This suggests that network doesn’t matter as much as the show, and so giving people the tools to share the show is a higher priority. However, if you notice when you’re watching a TV show, there is a ton of network advertising…but nobody really shares at this level so it’s just not that effective.
  3. Make it easier to share
    How do you make something easier to share? Make it a PDF that people can email. Provide an explicit permalink to the URL. If you’ve got a video you place the embed code right alongside it. (and build the functionality to support the actual embedding). If you’ve got a book review, you might put an “email this” share feature beside it. Prompt the user to share and give them tools to do so.
  4. Personalize the share
    How can you make the act of sharing more effective? One thing you can do is to personalize the share message. Instead of saying “a friend wanted to share with you”. say “Your friend Josh wanted to share with you”. This is a more compelling message, especially in a age of SPAM when we are inundated with fake sharing all the time.
  5. Follow-up the sharing
    Also, follow-up the share. Who did they send it to? Did that person come and interact as a result of the sharing? Pay attention to this metric because it measures whether or not people are sharing your stuff persuasively. If they are not, help them do so by prompting them with a default message. Also, if it makes sense record the message that was shared so you can know if there are issues you’re not aware of.
  6. Leverage the Popularity of Sharing
    Create a “most shared” list. This helps people find the best content when they are looking for it. However, this probably isn’t a good primary navigation strategy because then people rely on it too much. Have it available, but make it secondary so that all of your content is still available and exposed.

Building tools for sharing is how you enable word-of-mouth online. By breaking it down into a process with many steps, you can begin to optimize each step and therefore improve the overall effect.

Improve your online sharing
Josh
Mon, 24 Sep 2007 13:19:18 GMT

Tom Peter's 5 P's of Innovation

I really liked this set of principles of innovation success from Tom Peters Company.

Pissed-offedness - Something that makes you so mad, that you decide enough is enough, let's fix this!  Dick Nettel of Bank of America tells the story of how people had to press a buzzer to get in and out of the mail room at the bank. The buzzer was 'important' for security reasons.  They figured out a way around that buzzer,Dick said, 'it was like a light bulb went off,fix the problem."

Passion - Passion drives most non-profit companies, so why not organizations?  Dyson who invented the first vacuum that wouldn't lose suction was passionate about his invention, even though it scared the other vacuum companies. The other vacuum companies couldn't imagine a bagless vacuum, after all, bags were worth millions in sales.  Dyson almost went broke bringing his vacuum to market. Passion prevailed.

Pals - Never go it alone. If you want to go out on the limb, be sure to have someone holding on to you so that you don't fall.  LeJeune from Fabcon manufacturing came up with an idea to make concrete panels for building lighter.  He had two other Fabcon employees in on the idea, who served as sounding boards. The company eventually created a new product called VersaCore, which according to Gallup helped the company to stay in business.

Politics - What is it that no one likes, it exists everywhere, and everyone is guilty of it but me? Politics would be the right answer.  Think of politics like gaining sponsorship, and as a way to get your idea 'sold' in the corporate marketplace. We all need influential people who can help market and sell a good idea.  Every project needs a project sponsor or champion

Persistence - Most ideas will get shot down before a person finish speaking, but those who prevail will not give up on an idea.  There were two sisters who invented a product called Ghostline, this is a poster board with faint lines so that you can write straight on the paper, but it looks as if no lines exist.  They invented this product after helping their young relative with a science project where they had to start over several times to get it right.  They stayed with their idea until they found a paper company that would produce it for them. Their persistence paid off, they now get royalty checks in the mail, from not only the company that is producing the paper, but from a competitor that tried to copy their idea!

If you want Tom's PowerPoint slides on innovation, you can download them from his site:
http://www.tompeters.com/slides/uploaded/TRY_It_072407.ppt

Tom Peter's 5 P's of Innovation
Joyce Wycoff
Tue, 14 Aug 2007 15:56:05 GMT

Business Management US Article: Key trends in governance, risk, and compliance technology

Companies are preparing for risks by allocating resources to strategic planning, risk assessment and risk mitigation.  A new holistic approach to managing governance, risk management and compliance is called GRC. Without an integrate effort on all three dimensions, companies waste resouces while remaining vulnerable to global risks.

Robin Good's review of Google Presentations

Google Presentations: The New Google Docs Module For Sharing, Co-Editing And Creating Online Presentations - Robin Good's Latest News

I have started using Google docs for some of my collaborative work with clients, but so far Google docs has not replaced Microsoft Office in any meaningful way in my work life.  I have been waiting for an online presentation authoring tool that comfortably allows co-editing and co-creation of presentations.  Apparently Google's new presentation module does just that and Robin Good gives it a good review.

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